Prochlorperazine MedlinePlus Drug Information
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Prochlorperazine MedlinePlus Drug Information


Polemeds.orgProchlorperazine
3.3.2017 | Nicholas Babcock
Prochlorperazine
Prochlorperazine MedlinePlus Drug Information

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Continue to use prochlorperazine even if you feel well. If you are using prochlorperazine to treat schizophrenia, prochlorperazine may help control your symptoms but will not cure your condition. Do not stop using prochlorperazine without talking to your doctor. If you suddenly stop using prochlorperazine, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and shakiness.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online ( http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch ) or by phone.

Keep all appointments with your doctor.

Studies have shown that older adults with dementia (a brain disorder that affects the ability to remember, think clearly, communicate, and perform daily activities and that may cause changes in mood and personality) who take antipsychotics (medications for mental illness) such as prochlorperazine have an increased chance of death during treatment.

Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription. Do not let anyone else take or use your medication.

Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website ( http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p ) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

Duplication for commercial use must be authorized by ASHP. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 4500 East-West Highway, Suite 900, Bethesda, Maryland. AHFS Patient Medication Information., 2017.

Before having any laboratory test, l your doctor and the laboratory technician that you are taking prochlorperazine.

Your doctor may start you on a low dose of prochlorperazine and gradually increase your dose, not more often than once every 2-3 days.

Do not try to test for pregnancy at home. Prochlorperazine may interfere with the results of home pregnancy tests. Talk to your doctor if you think you might be pregnant during your treatment with prochlorperazine.

If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911. In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at.

Unless your doctor ls you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital.

l your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking this medication. Prochlorperazine may cause other side effects.

Store prochlorperazine suppositories in their wrappers; do not unwrap a suppository until just before you insert it. Store the medication at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children.

Prochlorperazine is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of behavior problems in older adults with dementia. For more information, visit the FDA website: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs. Talk to the doctor who prescribed this medication if you, a family member, or someone you care for has dementia and is taking prochlorperazine.

However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it.

Use prochlorperazine at around the same time(s) every day. Prochlorperazine comes as a tablet to take by mouth and as a suppository to place in the rectum. Prochlorperazine suppositories are usually inserted twice a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use prochlorperazine exactly as directed. Prochlorperazine tablets are usually taken three to four times a day by adults and are usually given to children one to three times a day. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Generic alternatives may be available. ¶ This branded product is no longer on the market.

Prochlorperazine is in a class of medications called conventional antipsychotics. Prochlorperazine suppositories and tablets are used to control severe nausea and vomiting. Prochlorperazine tablets are also used to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual thinking, loss of interest in life, and strong or inappropriate emotions). Prochlorperazine should not be used to treat any condition in children who are younger than 2 years old or who weigh less than 20 pounds (about 9 kilograms). Prochlorperazine tablets are also used on a short-term basis to treat anxiety that could not be controlled by other medications. It works by decreasing abnormal excitement in the brain.

Prochlorperazine