Prochlorperazine Uses, Side Effects & Warnings
Home A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Prochlorperazine Uses, Side Effects & Warnings


Polemeds.orgProchlorperazine
6.6.2017 | Natalie Carter
Prochlorperazine
Prochlorperazine Uses, Side Effects & Warnings

The risk of this side effect is higher in women and older adults. The longer you take prochlorperazine, the more likely you are to develop this movement disorder. Long-term use of prochlorperazine can cause a serious movement disorder that may not be reversible.

Available for Android and iOS devices. The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records.

tremors or shaking in your arms or legs;

Usual Pediatric Dose for Schizophrenia:

Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall. This medication may cause drowsiness or blurred vision and may impair your thinking or reactions. Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy.

Prochlorperazine is not approved for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia. Prochlorperazine may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at.

uncontrolled muscle movements in your face (chewing, lip smacking, frowning, tongue movement, blinking or eye movement); or.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Nausea/Vomiting:

heart disease, high blood pressure;

Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of prochlorperazine.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction : hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

To make sure prochlorperazine is safe for you, l your doctor if you have:

Pregnancy Category N Not classified.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Follow all directions on your prescription label.

severe nervous system reaction--very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, feeling like you might pass out.

Overdose can cause severe drowsiness, irregular heartbeats, feeling restless and agitated, or seizure (convulsions).

Usual Adult Dose for Nausea/Vomiting:

Psychosis Compazine, haloperidol, Haldol, chlorpromazine, Thorazine, perphenazine, fluphenazine, Prolixin, More. More FDA updates.

Common side effects may include: headache, dizziness, drowsiness; blurred vision;

Availability Rx/OTC Rx and/or OTC.

Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using prochlorperazine. Do not stop using prochlorperazine suddenly after long-term use, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms.

Nausea / Vomiting promethazine, lorazepam, meclizine, ondansetron, Ativan, Zofran, hydroxyzine, Benadryl, More.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Approval History Calendar Drug history at FDA.

Anxiety Xanax, Lexapro, Cymbalta, alprazolam, atenolol, lorazepam, duloxetine, venlaine, More.

CSA Schedule N Not a controlled drug.

Patients should receive the lowest effective dose. Dose adjustments may be made after the first day. -When symptoms are controlled with the IM formulation, patients should be switched to oral formulations at the same dose or higher. Less than 2 years or less than 9 kg: Use is contraindicated 2 to 12 years: Oral: -Initial dose: 2.5 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day -Maximum dose: 20 mg/day (2 to 5 years); 25 mg/day (6 to 12 years) Parenteral: -Usual dose: 0.132 mg/kg IM once Comments: -Patients should not receive more than 10 mg of the oral formulation on the first day of treatment. -At moderate doses, pediatric patients may be more prone to extrapyramidal reactions. Use: Treatment of schizophrenia.

Date modified: July 02, 2017 Last reviewed: July 14, 2014.

We comply with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information - verify here.

decreased white blood cells--sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, sore throat, flu symptoms, mouth sores, trouble swallowing;

Talk with your doctor before giving this medication to a child who has been ill with a fever or flu symptoms. Prochlorperazine is not for use in children younger than 2 years old or weighing less than 20 pounds.

if you have ever had a serious side effect while using prochlorperazine or another phenothiazine; or.

seizures, or a history of brain tumor; Parkinson's disease;

missed menstrual periods; or sleep problems (insomnia).

a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

slow heart rate, weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing;

Usual Adult Dose for Anxiety:

Do not give this medication to a child or teenager with a fever, flu symptoms, or an infectious disease such as chickenpox, measles, stomach flu, or an infection of the central nervous system.

Generic Name: prochlorperazine (oral) (pro klor PER a zeen) Brand Name: Compazine.

Prolonged IM therapy should be used in rare cases. Mild psychotic disorders: -Usual dose: 5 to 10 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day Moderate to severe psychotic disorders: Oral: -Initial dose: 10 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day, increasing the dose in small increments every 2 to 3 days until symptoms are controlled or side effects become bothersome -Maintenance dose: 50 to 75 mg/day for some patients; 100 to 150 mg/day for patients with more severe disturbances Parenteral: -Initial dose: 10 to 20 mg IM, repeated every 2 to 4 hours (or every hour in resistant cases), if necessary -Prolonged therapy: 10 to 20 mg IM every 4 to 6 hours Comments: -Many patients respond after the first injection; more than 3 to 4 IM doses are seldom required. Use: Treatment of schizophrenia. -Once patients are controlled on parenteral formulations, oral formulations should be used at the same dose or higher.

little or no urinating;

Be sure the doctor knows ahead of time that you are taking this medication. If you need to have an x-ray or CT scan of your spinal column using a dye that is injected into a vein, you may need to temporarily stop taking prochlorperazine.

lupus-like syndrome--joint pain or swelling with fever, swollen glands, muscle aches, chest pain, vomiting, unusual thoughts or behavior, and patchy skin color; or.

dry mouth, stuffy nose; constipation;

l your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Prochlorperazine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby.

bladder obstruction or other urination problems;

You should not use prochlorperazine if you have recently used alcohol, sedatives, tranquilizers, or narcotic medications.

severe asthma or other breathing problem; glaucoma;

Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 9.01.

Stop taking prochlorperazine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these signs of a serious movement disorder:

adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma);

liver or kidney disease;

Side effects such as painful or difficult urination, constipation, and confusion may be more likely in older adults.

This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed here. l your doctor about all your medications and any you start or stop using during treatment with prochlorperazine. Many drugs can interact with prochlorperazine.

if you also take certain other medications--lithium, propranolol, a diuretic or "water pill," a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin), or seizure medication.

If you take prochlorperazine long-term, you may need frequent medical tests.

provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy. Data sources include Micromedex (updated June 2nd, 2017), Cerner Multum (updated June 5th, 2017), Wolters Kluwer (updated June 6th, 2017) and others. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

You should not use prochlorperazine if you are allergic to it, or if you have recently used alcohol, sedatives, tranquilizers, or narcotic medications.

Prochlorperazine may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related conditions. Prochlorperazine is not approved for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia.

l your doctor if you will be exposed to extreme heat or cold, or to insecticide poisons while you are taking prochlorperazine.

a blockage in your intestines;

Taking this medicine with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can cause dangerous or life-threatening side effects. Ask your doctor before taking prochlorperazine with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Use: Control of severe nausea and vomiting. Patients should receive the lowest effective dose. Less than 2 years or less than 9 kg: Use is contraindicated 2 years and older: Oral: 9 to 13 kg: 2.5 mg orally 1 to 2 times a day; maximum dose is 7.5 mg/day 13 to 18 kg: 2.5 mg orally 2 to 3 times a day; maximum dose is 10 mg/day 18 to 39 kg: 2.5 mg orally 3 times a day OR 5 mg orally 2 times a day; maximum dose is 15 mg/day Parenteral: -Usual dose: 0.132 mg/kg IM once Comments: -At moderate doses, pediatric patients may be more prone to extrapyramidal reactions. -Continued oral treatment after day 1, and parenteral treatment after the first dose is usually not necessary.

Oral: -Usual dose: 5 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day -Maximum dose: 20 mg/day -Duration of therapy: Up to 12 weeks Use: Short-term treatment of generalized non-psychotic anxiety.

l your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether prochlorperazine will harm an unborn baby.

It works by changing the actions of chemicals in your brain. Prochlorperazine is an anti-psychotic medicine in a group of drugs called phenothiazines (FEEN-oh-THYE-a-zeens).

Mild psychotic disorders: -Usual dose: 5 to 10 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day Moderate to severe psychotic disorders: Oral: -Initial dose: 10 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day, increasing the dose in small increments every 2 to 3 days until symptoms are controlled or side effects become bothersome -Maintenance dose: 50 to 75 mg/day for some patients; 100 to 150 mg/day for patients with more severe disturbances Parenteral: -Initial dose: 10 to 20 mg IM, repeated every 2 to 4 hours (or every hour in resistant cases), if necessary -Prolonged therapy: 10 to 20 mg IM every 4 to 6 hours Comments: -Many patients respond after the first injection; more than 3 to 4 IM doses are seldom required. Prolonged IM therapy should be used in rare cases. Use: Treatment of schizophrenia. -Once patients are controlled on parenteral formulations, oral formulations should be used at the same dose or higher.

mild itching or rash;

Prochlorperazine oral (taken by mouth) is used to treat psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. It is also used to treat anxiety, and to control severe nausea and vomiting.

Other brands: Compazine, Compro.

Taking antipsychotic medication during the last 3 months of pregnancy may cause problems in the newborn, such as withdrawal symptoms, breathing problems, feeding problems, fussiness, tremors, and limp or stiff muscles. However, you may have withdrawal symptoms or other problems if you stop taking your medicine during pregnancy. If you become pregnant while taking prochlorperazine, do not stop taking it without your doctor's advice.

Usual Adult Dose for Schizophrenia:

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. Take the missed dose as soon as you remember.

See also: Side effects (in more detail).

Prochlorperazine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Usual Adult Dose for Psychosis:

past or present breast cancer;

Subscribe to receive notifications whenever new articles are published.

Also call your doctor at once if you have:

jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

any new or unusual muscle movements you cannot control.

feeling restless, jittery, or agitated;

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur.

Severe Nausea and Vomiting: Oral: -Usual dose: 5 to 10 mg orally 3 to 4 times a day -Maximum dose: 40 mg/day Parenteral: IM: -Usual dosage: 5 to 10 mg IM, repeated every 3 to 4 hours as necessary. -Maximum dose: 40 mg/day IV: -Usual dose: 2.5 to 10 mg slow IV injection or infusion at a rate not exceeding 5 mg/min -Maximum dose: 10 mg (single dose); 40 mg/day Rectal: -Usual dose: 25 mg rectally 2 times a day Adult Surgery (Severe Nausea and Vomiting): Parenteral: IM: -Usual dose: 5 to 10 mg IM 1 to 2 hours before anesthesia OR to control acute symptoms during/after surgery, repeated once (in 30 minutes) if necessary -Maximum dose: 40 mg/day IV: -Usual dose: 5 to 10 mg slow IV injection or infusion (at a rate not exceeding 5 mg/min) 15 to 30 minutes before anesthesia OR to control acute symptoms during/after surgery, repeated once if necessary -Maximum dose: 10 mg (single dose) Comments: -Resistant cases may require oral doses exceeding 40 mg/day. -This drug may be given as an undiluted or diluted IV solution; however, bolus IV injections should be avoided. Use: Control of severe nausea and vomiting. -Patients receiving parenteral formulations may be more likely to experience hypotension.

Prochlorperazine