Clorazepate
Home A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Clorazepate



Tranxene (Clorazepate Dipotassium) Side Effects, Interactions

3.12.2017 | Nicholas Babcock
Clorazepate
Tranxene (Clorazepate Dipotassium) Side Effects, Interactions

TRANXENE T-TAB tablets contain either 3.75 mg, 7.5 mg or 15 mg of clorazepate dipotassium for oral administration. Inactive ingredients for.

The serum half-life is about 2 days. The drug is metabolized in the liver and excreted primarily in the urine. Pharmacologically, clorazepate dipotassium has the characteristics of the benzodiazepines. It has depressant effects on the central nervous system. The primary metabolite, nordiazepam, quickly appears in the blood stream.

Discontinue drug therapy as soon as patient's condition is stable. Thereafter, gradually reduce the daily dose to 7.5 to 15 mg.

The usual precautions in treating patients with impaired renal or hepatic function should also be observed.

Clorazepate

5.14.2017 | Natalie Carter
Clorazepate
Clorazepate

Clorazepate (marketed under the brand names Tranxene and Novo-Clopate), also known as clorazepate dipotassium, is a benzodiazepine. It possesses anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, sedative, hypnotic, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.

Withdrawal symptoms from benzodiazepines include a worsening of pre-existing symptoms as well as the appearance of new symptoms that were not pre-existing. When used for seizure control, tolerance may manifest itself with an increased rate of seizures as well an increased risk of withdrawal seizures. Withdrawal from benzodiazepines should be gradual as abrupt withdrawal from high doses of benzodiazepines may cause confusion, toxic psychosis, convulsions, or a condition resembling delirium tremens.

Clorazepate Indications, Side Effects, Warnings

7.16.2017 | Ashley Kendal
Clorazepate
Clorazepate Indications, Side Effects, Warnings

Treating anxiety disorders, certain types of seizures, and symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine. You may have an increased risk of serious side effects.

Seizure Prevention clonazepam, diazepam, Klonopin, Topamax, lamotrigine, Lamictal, topiramate, Valium, More.

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

Clorazepate MedlinePlus Drug Information

6.15.2017 | Natalie Carter
Clorazepate
Clorazepate MedlinePlus Drug Information

Clorazepate is also used along with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. It is also used to relieve unpleasant symptoms that may be experienced by people who have stopped drinking alcohol after drinking large amounts for a long time. Clorazepate is in a class of medications called benzodiazepines.

If you suddenly stop taking clorazepate, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as nervousness, difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, irritability, diarrhea, muscle aches, memory problems, seizures, confusion, uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body, stomach cramps, muscle cramps, vomiting, or sweating. Clorazepate may help to control seizures and anxiety, but it will not cure these conditions. Continue to take clorazepate even if you feel well. Do not stop taking clorazepate without talking to your doctor.

Common Side Effects of Tranxene (Clorazepate Dipotassium) Drug

12.21.2017 | Ashley Kendal
Clorazepate
Common Side Effects of Tranxene (Clorazepate Dipotassium) Drug

Find a comprehensive guide to possible side effects including common and rare side effects when taking Tranxene (Clorazepate Dipotassium) for healthcare.

Drug Interaction Tool Check Potential Drug Interactions.

Common side effects of Tranxene include:. Tranxene is available in a generic form. Tranxene (clorazepate dipotassium) is a benzodiazepine used to treat anxiety, seizure disorders, and alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

There have been reports of abnormal liver and kidney function tests and of decrease in hematocrit.

Medical Editor: John P.